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    As a music maker, it is important to present yourself as best as possible when sending your work out to companies in the music world in hopes of getting your songs featured. These companies are usually drowned in thousands of submissions a month, so it's important to set yourself apart from the crowd if you are able to do so. Here are a few tips that can help you raise eyebrows of a music reviewer, music director, blogger, A&R or anyone rating your material. 

    Personable Messages

    Addressing the person you are submitting to with a charming and likable approach is a sure way to stand apart from the rest of the submissions that people get. Most artists just send material without personal greetings at all. Remember that the receiver is still, in fact, a person! Just because we're in the digital age doesn't mean you should forget your manners. Say hello in your emails. Thank them in advance for reviewing your material and giving your work a chance. Write a bit about what you like about their company and how you appreciate their vision before blabbing on about yours. 

    Previous Accolades and Awards

    Nothing says 'I'm talented' like mentioning a few awards or accolades that you've received in the past. If you got it, flaunt it! In a reviewer's mind, artists, musicians, and bands that have won awards in the past usually have above average material that is worth checking out. Just be sure not to make up any bogus awards or mention something that your mom gave you out of love and support; that doesn't really count. 

    Touring (past and present)

    Sharing previous or future tour information is another great way to stand apart from those who are limited to making music in their basement. Not to say that the basement dwellers aren't talented, but those who have tour and performance experience usually have more musical skill and a stronger music brand. Let reviewers know that you share your music online and off!

    Quality Music Videos

    Most indie artists these days don't have music videos that have potential to go viral, so if a submission includes a link with a screenshot that looks high-quality, you're successfully raising your chances of being liked. On the flipside, while medium and low-quality videos are a fun and valuable experience for artists and musicians to have, professional music outlets aren't really interested in seeing the videos you made on your phone. 

    Music Distribution 

    A good way to show that you're serious about your music release is to make it available on popular outlets like Spotify and iTunes. All indie music makers have the ability to do so without being signed to a label thanks to distribution companies like CDBaby, Tunecore, and Distrokid, but less than 30% of artists are actually using these types of resources. Be sure that you're in that 30%!